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The hulk name comes from the idea of a diverging purple and green theme that is colorblind safe and visually appealing. It is a useful alternative to the red/green palette where purple typically can indicate low or "bad" value, and green can indicate a high or "good" value.

Usage

gt_hulk_col_numeric(
  gt_object,
  columns = NULL,
  domain = NULL,
  ...,
  trim = FALSE
)

Arguments

gt_object

An existing gt table object of class gt_tbl

columns

The columns wherein changes to cell data colors should occur.

domain

The possible values that can be mapped.

For col_numeric and col_bin, this can be a simple numeric range (e.g. c(0, 100)); col_quantile needs representative numeric data; and col_factor needs categorical data.

If NULL, then whenever the resulting colour function is called, the x value will represent the domain. This implies that if the function is invoked multiple times, the encoding between values and colours may not be consistent; if consistency is needed, you must provide a non-NULL domain.

...

Additional arguments passed to scales::col_numeric()

trim

trim the palette to give less intense maximal colors

Value

An object of class gt_tbl.

Examples

library(gt)
 # basic use
 hulk_basic <- mtcars %>%
   head() %>%
   gt::gt() %>%
   gt_hulk_col_numeric(mpg)

 hulk_trim <- mtcars %>%
   head() %>%
   gt::gt() %>%
   # trim gives small range of colors
   gt_hulk_col_numeric(mpg:disp, trim = TRUE)

 # option to reverse the color palette
 hulk_rev <- mtcars %>%
   head() %>%
   gt::gt() %>%
   # trim gives small range of colors
   gt_hulk_col_numeric(mpg:disp, reverse = TRUE)

Figures

Function ID

4-1

See also

Other Colors: gt_color_box(), gt_color_rows()